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Releasing Your Dog from a Trap or Snare

Posted by John Robison at Oct 11, 2013 06:40 PM |

Idaho is a great place to go hiking with pets. But wolves, hunters, and various traps and snares can pose a threat to your dog. ICL produced a 5-part video series on how to release your dog from a trap or snare. See those and learn other tips to help keep your pup safe in the outdoors.

Releasing Your Dog from a Trap or Snare

JR saves Rex and Lassie. ICL photo.

Idaho is a great place to go hiking with pets. But wolves, hunters, and various traps and snares can all pose a threat to your dog. Here are some tips to help keep your pup safe in the outdoors. 

You should keep your dogs close (ideally on leash) in wolf country since wolves perceive dogs as intruders into their territories or den sites and attack them.

If your dog could be mistaken for a coyote or wolf in low light or dense brush, affix an orange bandana or hunting harness around your pet during wolf hunting season. In many parts of the state, the 2013-2014 hunting season for wolves opened Aug 30.

The trapping season begins in many areas Nov 15. Dogs are attracted to the same scents that trappers use to attract wolves. Knowing how to quickly release your dog from a wolf trap or snare could mean the difference between your pet’s life and death.  

ICL partnered with Carter Niemeyer, a wolf expert, trapper and celebrated author, to produce a series of short videos about releasing your pet from different types of traps. Check out the videos to learn what kinds of traps are used, how to safely release a trapped pet, and what tools you may need. 

Because trapped dogs often panic, the first thing is put a jacket over your dog’s head to calm it and protect yourself from being bitten. The Idaho Department of Fish and Game occasionally hosts workshops to teach dog owners to deal with traps and snares.

Remember, if you encounter a lawfully set trap in Idaho, it is illegal for you to tamper with it unless your pet is trapped. If you come across a trap in a location that is likely to harm children or pets, contact the IDFG (208.334.3700 or http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/feedback/getForm.cfm).

Being knowledgeable about the steps you can take protect your dog could save its life. More information about specific areas, harvest limits, and seasons can be found at the Idaho Fish and Game website


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harm from traps

Posted by Paul/Ann Hill at Oct 24, 2013 09:42 AM
Thanks for this great video. We invite you to partner with PAWS (in UTAH) and Footloose (in Montana) to help further educate people on releasing pets from traps. If you are serious about this issue, however, help us expose Wildlife Services' activities which kill/maim thousands of pets and non-target species annually. They are the real "problem trappers" that far too few members of the public know about.

That would be a worthwhile undertaking for ICL.

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