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Rules of Building Safety (Rule 07-0301-1901) – 2020

Summary: This rule proposes to adopt and amend the 2018 editions of the International Building Code (IBC), International Residential Code (IRC), International Existing Building Code (IEBC), and International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), which provide guidelines to ensure homes are safe to live in, built to last and affordable to operate.

ICL's position: Support

Current Bill Status: Approved

Issue Areas: Climate Change

Official Legislative Site

This session, Senators Jim Patrick (R-Twin Falls), Jeff Agenbraod (R-Nampa) and Todd Lakey (R-Nampa) pushed to completely remove the Idaho Energy Conservation Code from building code rules. Thankfully, Sen. Jim Guthrie (R-Inkom) offered a competing motion which prevailed on a 6 to 3 vote in the Senate Commerce Committee.

Meanwhile, Rep. Joe Palmer (R-Meridian) offered a motion in the House Business Committee to strike the entire energy code as well. His motion was successful, but the Senate’s action should be the end of the story for this session because approval by only one legislative chamber is needed to adopt rules.

Idaho Energy Conservation Codes matter because they protect consumers. The codes provide standards to build efficient homes that keep our energy costs low and ensure our homes are safe. While building homes to standards may cost a few more dollars up front, these regulations save Idaho homeowners an estimated $15 per month, paying off the initial investment in a matter of months.

Builders, contractors, realtors and power producers are all supportive of Idaho’s Energy Codes, which ensure a level playing field and set clear direction on how homes should be built.

Why this happened: In 2018, the Idaho Legislature adopted and amended Idaho building code standards, bringing the state up to 2012 industry standards. When the Idaho House of Representatives rejected the renewal of all of Idaho’s Administrative Rules in 2019, it mandated Idaho’s entire administrative code come back for review in 2020.